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When Change Doesn’t Stick

I haven’t always known what I know now about change and change management. Let me tell you about one change I tried to implement for years and failed at getting the new behaviours to stick. The change was not an organizational change but a personal one. But like I’ve talked about before change management isn’t just for the workplace. This change initiative taught me several valuable lessons that helps guide my practice today and can help you with your organizational change.

How Sports Can Influence Organizational Change

Recently I had a conversation about the use of sports analogies and language in business. It was surprising how much the language of business is grounded in the language of sport. I have stopped counting the number of times I hear someone use a sports analogy when talking about business, organizational change, or her team. I frequently use a sports metaphor to describe a concept, despite not being a sports enthusiast.

How an Executive Team Used an Intended Outcome Story to Reduce Conflict

Let me tell you a story about a client I worked with. They asked me to help them create a working environment that enabled them and the employees to quickly identify and adopt new ways of working individually and together. They needed to work with the different working styles and explore multiple perspectives without creating conflict.

What do you do when your company is mandating change?

"They don’t have a choice the change is mandated." That is a statement I have heard many leaders say especially over the past few months. It reminded me of a question I am asked often: What do you do to manage the change when it’s mandated?

The Power of a Readiness Mindset

Many leaders and most articles talk about a particular person or group of people as “being resistant to change.” It is viewed as an inevitable part of the change process or a personality or group trait. I frequently hear leaders say, “I like change, but my employees don’t.”  As if they are somehow different or more agreeable to change than their employees.